Thumper Diaries

Thumper Diaries

About the blog

This blog is to be a diary of our activities and the trials and tribulations of owning a Royal Enfield Bullet 500.

For spares and such, I normally go to Hitchcocks Motorcycles

For a complete log (linked index) of all the posts in this blog, go here: Diary log






Fuel consumption

MaintenancePosted by exile Fri, May 26, 2017 01:27:30
Something I do worry about is the amount of fuel I have left in the tank. I have no fuel gauge to go by. I know that if all goes according to plan, when Thumper stutters and dies out on the road, I need only to turn the fuel tap to 'reserve' and I can continue on to the nearest petrol station. Hardly comforting though, as I don't really know how much fuel I have in reserve!
For the past year I have been keeping an eye on the mileage (or should that be kilometerage?) compared to the amounts of fuel I put in the tank. It is not entirely accurate as one cannot guarantee that one always fills up to precisely the same level in the tank, but it is close enough to draw some sort of conclusion.
My preferred fuel is Shell V-power. It may be a little more expensive but it is of a slightly higher octane content and burns very cleanly. Thumper loves the stuff and he runs sweetly on it.

My conclusion is that I cover about 24 Km/litre. In old money that is about 69 MPG, allowing for my limited maths skills and uncertainties as mentioned above.
Thumpers tank holds 14 litres of fuel. That's a little over 3 gallons.

My range then, is around 336 Km or 207 miles. Not too shabby. Eh?

So I'll be filling up every 250 Km or so from now on. Now, where did I put that notebook..?





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Oil Suction Gun

MaintenancePosted by exile Mon, May 08, 2017 21:08:16
Here's a great little tool, made for oil changes. I wasn't really looking for it but when I do find these handy things, I buy them. Even better, it was on offer at about half price.

Remembering the problems I had with filling the timing chest under the last oil change, and seeing that this thing holds up to a half liter of oil, which is what the timing chest needs, how could I say no? I had solved the problem last time by doctoring a half liter water bottle. It worked, yes, but it was far from ideal.

I won't necessarily be using it to remove oil but it certainly will help with filling the timing chest which is pretty difficult to fill through the push rod adjuster hatch. I can't pour horizontally...

The plastic tube is about 3/8 inch bore and can be replaced by whatever length one wants.

Another practical application, of course, is that if one overfills the sump at oil change, this can easily remove some of the oil.





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Removing the Dent

MaintenancePosted by exile Wed, August 31, 2016 19:26:03
I was forced to step off a while back. By a female jogger who had made herself deliberately deaf to the traffic by using ear-buds and blind by looking at the indispensible iPhone in her hand. She ran out in front of me and I was forced to drop the bike to avoid wiping her off the face of the earth. Luckily, I wasn't going that fast.
The resulting contact with the road wasn't too bad but my left knee caught the tank and left it with a sizeable dent. That was two years ago. Here's the offending blemish.



Finally annoyed enough to do something about it, I decided to consult a professional. Not easy, because the body shops are good at cars but are, for some reason, unwilling to take on bikes. I finally found a newly started business and approached them. Reluctantly, they agreed to take on the job. I met up at ten in the morning and waited for the youngster to have a look at Thumper's dent. "I'll try." he said.

I explained that I had seen a hot glue puller thing on the TV. He agreed that would do the job and so he got started. "My first bike." he explained. "I know." I said. Reassuring him that I knew the risk involved and would hold him blame free in the event of a catastrophic failure of the paintwork, he applied the glue and the tap and got to work with the puller.

Two minutes later and the dent was gone. He then got to work with a dorn and a hammer and dressed the area around the now non-existant dent. The result was about as close to perfect as anyone could get. The dent is gone for ever. Here's the result.. Nothing to see.


There are those who would try to do this as a DIY project. There are kits that can be bought and there is also a process of heating the area and then rapid cooling with compressed air. I'm sure some will have had some success with this. I tried the heat and cool thing mysef but it didn't get the dent out despite my concerted efforts.

In the end, I'm glad I went to a pro. We both learned something and, for him, my money is as good as the next mans. Maybe they'll take more bikes now.
My sincere thanks to the young man who did the job. He's a clever lad. I hope the business does well.



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Out With The Old..

MaintenancePosted by exile Fri, April 17, 2015 23:49:26
..and in with the new. Oil, that is.

It isn't easy finding 20w/50 oil in Denmark. In fact, it's virtually non-existent for some strange reason but being a stubborn old sod when I need to be, I found a supplier in Jutland. Jutland is a bit like a foreign country for us here on Zealand but they do have Castrol in real tin cans. I ordered a gallon.



I've never done the complete oil change on Thumper before. OK, I drained the sump once and the tank, if you can call it a tank but this time I drained the pump and timing chest as well. A lot of very black oil came out but no swarf. Which means that all is well inside the engine. I didn't strip out the pump though. Thumper has only done 2300 miles (3700 km) so it shouldn't be necessary until next time, or so I am told. Getting the old stuff out is relatively easy. Remove the three drain plugs under the engine and the quill bolt at the bottom of the timing chest. Then leave it to drain for a half hour or so..

According to the manual, the whole engine holds 2.25 litres. About 5 pints in old money. For those that may be interested, a gallon is 3.8 litres

Filling it up again was a bit more problematic. To avoid a dry start, it's a good idea to refill the timing chest. One can pour oil in through the push rod cover but how does one pour horizontally? One doesn't. I fashioned a syringe like affair with a half litre water bottle and a piece of neoprene tubing. Bore through the bottle top and insert the tube. Make sure it's a tight fit. Fill the bottle and put the cap on. Insert the tube into the push rod channel and squeeze the bottle. It takes a while, but it works.. After that, simply fill the engine with the remaining 1.75 litres of oil and the job is nearly done.
Start the machine and let it run for five minutes or so, checking for leaks. Stop the thing and wait a while. Pull the dipstick and see if your level holds true. Mine did.

Job done. smiley









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Broke Brake

MaintenancePosted by exile Sat, June 07, 2014 18:03:51

Sometimes my own eagerness catches me out…

Having decided I needed to exchange my existing tyres for something more rounded and modern I contacted my local workshop and asked if they could order and fit tyres for both front and back. Indeed they could but they didn’t have anything that fitted a piece of British iron, so they had to order something extraordinary in relation to their stock. Two weeks later, the guy rang me up and explained that he couldn’t find a tyre for the rear wheel, did I have any ideas? Yes I did, and duly pointed him in the right direction. Another three days passed and they were ready for Thumper.
I delivered him early in the morning and rang later to hear if they were finished. Yep. They were.. but.. one of the counter salesmen had sold my front tyre in the meantime while we were waiting for the rear, so the job is only half done…

Bugger!

Oh well, I collected Thumper and we are still waiting for a new tyre for the front wheel.

I got him home and looked at the state of him. Covered in greasy fingerprints. I decided to polish him up and get rid of the offending blotches. Putting Thumper on the centre stand I got busy with the rag and wax and, soon, he was looking fine again. Then I did something stupid. Taking him off the stand, I let Thumper fall away from me, I couldn’t hold him and the brake lever snapped like the proverbial carrot.

Here’s a picture of the resultant injury. I immediately ordered a new one from Hitchcock’s and had to wait five days for the part to arrive. It arrived today and I’ve fitted the thing already. So I can ride again.

Lessons learned: Don’t take the bike of the stand unless you are astride the bike. Cast alloy is weak as s***. I now know how to fit a new handbrake lever.

Whatever doesn’t kill me…!

And I still haven't heard from the workshop about my new front tyre....



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Thumper's New Home

MaintenancePosted by exile Mon, March 17, 2014 22:00:17
No, I haven't sold him. I've built him a new home. Or, rather more to the point, I've rebuilt and insulated the shed that he lives in. It's insulated all round, including the new roof, and it looks great inside.
I need to get a solid floor down to be absolutely done with it but for now, the old shed is looking like a palace inside. Big neon tubes under the ceiling give me some light to work by and I intend to build a workbench at the far end of the shed. I need to get some electricity in there too. At the moment I'm using a very long extension lead.
This is a job I've been intending to do for years. I always wanted a workshop and having Thumper to look after just made that all the more imperative.

Here's a picture of Thumper enjoying his new surroundings;



The whole job has taken some time and not a small amount of money but hey, you can't take it with you and I reckon it's well worth the investment. I'm looking forward to getting my larger power tools in there and really getting something done.

Welcome home Thumper.

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Oh, Bugger!

MaintenancePosted by exile Sat, February 22, 2014 23:45:06
It was all going so well. Then Thumper wouldn't tick over properly and he just didn't sound healthy. Deciding that I needed to adjust the tickover I began playing with the air screw and throttle stop on the carburettor. No matter what I did, I couldn't get him to run properly. Finally, I decided that the carburettor would have to come off and be looked at.
Then I found this:



The intake manifold rubber is split open. It has been on the bike since new and, according to advice I have received, this is a common problem.
It doesn't explain why the engine is running rich though. I would have thought it would be running lean due to the false intake of air so I may have to strip the carburettor and move the fuel needle down a tad to get my fuel right. Time will tell, but right now I have to replace the manifold hose.

Quick update:
Nice sunny day today, so.. as the carburettor was out anyway, I moved the stop on the main jet needle to a leaner setting just for the hell of it. Not a difficult job but you need a steady hand! It may solve the rich running...

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